The sweetness of all the notes melt into each other, but now we shall touch each string severally and by itself, and if you have an educated ear you will hear that which will solace your souls. and where wilt thou leave thy glory?" Now this implies one step further. There are four reasons why Jesus is the best Helper.I. Trapp. Who then can lay us low? "If God be for us, who can be against us?"(J. Amongst savage tribes it may almost be said that courage is the only virtue, for without it all other good qualities lose their value, and where it exists it covers a multitude of sins. "Who art thou, that thou shouldest be afraid of a man that shall die, and of the son of man which shall be made as grass?". I will strengthen you, surely I will help you, Surely I will uphold you with My righteous right hand. Brewin. M. Brown, LL. "Who art thou, that thou shouldest be afraid of a man that shall die, and of the son of man which shall be made as grass?"6. who has become the Friend of His people. WHO MAKES THE PROMISE? "Who art thou, that thou shouldest be afraid of a man that shall die, and of the son of man which shall be made as grass?"6. He well knows how, if He do not interpose openly, to deliver us in trouble, to infuse strength into our sinking hearts. It is Jehovah that speaks, who created the universe and governs it still.3. They are those whom He has not rejected from His service, in spite of the imperfections of which they are penitently conscious (ver. Newton, D. D.Two persons are spoken of here: "I" and "thee." I have read of those who bathe in those baths of Germany which are much impregnated with iron, that they have felt after bathing as if they were made of iron, and were able in the heat of the sun to cast off the heat as though they were dressed in steel. But to reassure you and make you feel how safe you are, see here!" I may be in danger and not know it; but my ignorance does not diminish my danger; it rather increases it. "I am with thee" is the fervent, soul-cheering argument to support it. )Security in God's companyJ. Talk about destitution, there are none so destitute as those who have no God.(C. just gives comfort knowing that im not alone in my battles knowing that my heavenly is there to strengthen and comfort and help me spiritually. Do you say, "If this be so, then ignorance is bliss"? IV. To these every honey-dropping word of this text belongs.I. So with the sinner; he enters upon this year amidst smiles and songs, and little dreams that ere the next year comes he will be in eternity. Now it is the same relationship between us and God; nay, it is a more sanctified one, for it is a relationship which exhibits the infinitude of His love, the unspeakableness of His mercy.3. Courage displays itself in many ways. In your trade you may have to pass through much tribulation.3. Birch. "Fear not, thou." )Fear and dismay -- an antidoteA. "I am afraid," was the reply; "and if you were half as afraid as I am you would run." They are God's servants, doing His will (ver. His knowledge would produce fear, but might lead to safety. To God's chosen ones (ver. A.F.V The first encouragement, then, is found in the Divine presence: "I am with thee."2. God was a kind of background to everything — hardly discerned, but there; this was all. God's all-sufficiency reaches beyond all wants.2. His constant acknowledgment is, "By the grace of God I am what I am."4. BECAUSE HE IS ALWAYS WILLING TO HELP. But sometimes He sees good reasons for not helping those who are in need.II. Knowledge that the cause is God's.(R. There is a way by which the Lord can be with His people, which is best of all, namely, by sensible manifestations of His presence, imparting joy and peace which surpass all understanding.III. You may have felt much fear about making a profession of your faith. But when the fearful thing is coming down, or when the children see it looming in the distance and are frightened, and they catch the Father's countenance, and see that He is not frightened, it wonderfully reassures the poor children to see a fearlessness on the Father's face. Let us enter our home — enter and be comforted, as all helpless things are, to find their source of supply so near. Garrett.)CourageR. Yet are there special occasions when the Comforter's work is needed, and one of these certainly is when we are racked with much physical pain. (1)Vast.(2)Rich.(3)Secure.(4)Everlasting.3. Fear is ruinous to our work.III. Men fear they may lose all they have in the world, and they know very well that if they lose their property they usually lose their friends. And we get gold wherever we like, and we get iron wherever we like, and we get coal wherever we can. He may not always be willing to help us just at the time, or in the way we desire, — that may not be best; but in His own time and way He is always willing to help.IV. Isaiah 41:10 Treasury of Scripture Knowing, The Concentration Of Spiritual Energy (part 1). Poverty, sickness, etc.5. "Who art thou, that thou shouldest be afraid of a man that shall die, and of the son of man which shall be made as grass?"6. More or less, believers need consolation at all times, because their life is a very peculiar one.1. All through life I may picture the saints as marching to its music, even as the children of Israel set forward to the notes of the silver trumpets.II. When all the currents of providence run counter to us.4. Solemnities shall follow which may well strike a man with awe as he thinks upon them. Fear throws a paralysis over the senses and faculties of man, so that flight and safety are more thought of than holding one's ground, or making headway against the enemy.2. "Fear thou not; be not dismayed." He never looks the creature should bring anything that he might procure it.5. 3. Solemnities shall follow which may well strike a man with awe as he thinks upon them. He knows himself: every day he lives he makes discoveries of his character that fill him with shame and sorrow. Why? Do not imagine for a moment that it is your wants that bring to you this succour. Dale of Birmingham, towards the close of his life, made the following entry in his diary: "Of course, when Sir Andrew Clark was sent for, and — and — came, I understood that my position was regarded as critical.